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Date: August 24th 1915
To
Sister
From
Howard Curtis
Letter

Somewhere in France
August 24, 1915

Dear Sister,

It's quiet here just at present so I'll write a few lines. We are in the front line again, just to the left of the First Battalion. The trenches are only forty yards from the Germans. Yesterday both sides got quite friendly for a few hours. They talked to each other and then suggested going out between the trenches and exchanging souvenirs. One of our men yelled over and said if the Germans would come half way we would go out and meet them. A sergeant and two privates accepted the challenge and climbed over the parapet. Then three of our men went out to meet them. They shook hands and exchanged cigarettes and small gifts. It was like declaring peace for a little while. The officers on both sides soon changed things and ordered their men back into the trenches. Neither side fired a shot and all returned safely.

There wasn't any sign of Peace last night. News of the big Naval Success and the success against the Turks raised our spirits high. We lined our trench and gave forth with three vigorous cheers. This alarmed the Germans, who thought we were about to attack them. When a sergeant who spoke German shouted out the news of our allied wins there was a big lull. They stopped singing and later there was loud talking as they discussed the news. Last night fresh troops were sent in and to-day there isn't a sign of friendship between us. There will likely be another big bust-up before long. The sooner the better, if it brings the war closer to a finish. We will likely be here six days longer and then it's back in reserve for a few days.

I am going out on an expedition in front of the lines to-night. Wish me good luck. We never take risky chances.

Give my love to all and write often.

I remain
Your loving brother
Howard

P.S. I forgot to hand my letters in to-day and will add a little more news now. Our expedition was successful last night. Two of us left the trench about six o'clock. We crawled along a ditch out to some old buildings just in front of the German barbed wire. This gave us a little cover to wait for darkness and just hope that a German patrol would come our way ... (missing)